CALL US: 866-728-2751

Teacher Tips Part 1: Relaxation!

Students aren’t the only ones taking some time off over the next few months. Our final summer series blog will share helpful tips for teachers focusing on key ways to relax, reorganize and refresh while not in the class room and still stay sharp! Our first tip for teachers– relax!

Relax

We know how hard it is for teachers to stop teaching once summer comes. More than once the phrase “You’re such a teacher” has probably been said about you. The personality traits and work ethic of stereotypical teachers are what make them wonderful caregivers and educators – but sometimes, we need to flip the switch and turn off “teacher mode.”

Make sure that when you ask your students “What did you do on your summer vacation?” that you have something equally interesting to share. Students learn and are inspired by their teachers who share experiences with them. Step away from teaching, just for a day, (or sometimes more) and give yourself the opportunity to recharge. Now, there is no need to break the bank planning an expensive trip, but a weekend getaway or annual family trip offers the perfect time for you to take time to not be a teacher - and prove you didn’t spend your summer at the grocery store, or living at school!

So, whether your passion is baseball, the beach or BBQ’s – utilize teacher blogs or your school webpage to share your fun (and appropriate) adventures with your future or current students.

Try something new – break outside of the teacher mold! Teachers, especially those in cyber education, typically don’t follow the “9-5 grind” office workers find themselves in. A summer break is a great time to get out and try something new – especially if it falls between the hours of 9-5. Check local deal websites to find new (and inexpensive) social outings in your area for singles, couples, or friends and take a stab at a baking, painting or yoga class.

Use VisitPA.com as a guide, and give yourself an adult field trip. Supervising 55 students around a museum or amusement park sometimes takes the fun out of class trips, but revisiting those sites with a significant other or group of adult friends can let you see things in a whole new light. Even historical sites can become an adventure if you actually have a full day to learn, explore and enjoy, without the worry of a few small shadows behind you constantly. As for the amusement park? Just ask any mom and dad who have been to Disney World before and after kids - think Epcot!

New Call-to-action

Top 5 Summer Reads for Grades 9-12 Part: 3

The final post in our summer reads series – this time we focus on books for young adults and high school aged students. These books will engage and challenge students with deep emotional storylines, and are set everywhere from small familiar towns to far off places.

classicbooks

Top 5 Summer Reads for High School Students

  1. BelieveMyFaithandtheTackleThatChangedMyLifeAny athlete or even sports fan will enjoy Believe: My Faith and the Tackle That Changed My Life by Eric LeGrand & Mike Yorkey. In 2010, LeGrand suffered a severe spinal cord injury at MetLife Stadium, as the Rutgers Scarlet Knights took on the Army Black Knights. It was believed that he would have a 0-5% regain full brain function, breathe on his own, or move from the neck down. The book chronicles the beginning of his journey to defy the odds, receive his degree and become a positive figure for young athletes. LeGrand is still making strides in his recovery and vows to walk again.
  2. The film adaptation of Me, and Earl and The Dying Girl by Jesse Andrews hits theaters this summer (with a PG13 rating) and is expected to have continued success after a successful debut at the Sundance film festival. Always follow the advice of reading the book before the movie; if you pick up this one, students will follow the story of Greg, who is forced to befriend Rachel, a Leukemia patient because their parents think it would be a good idea – and everything that happens after.
  3. IntheUnlikelyEventYA best-selling author Judy Blume releases her highly anticipated new novel In the Unlikely Event this summer, which will take readers back to the 1950’s in a small New Jersey town. The characters deal with the aftermath of 3 plane crashes and how each of them has been affected. Blume, who is praised for her coming of age themes in her novels, examines the tragedy of loss, humanity and love.
  4. The Sunlit Night, by Rebecca Dinerstien takes place in Lofoten, a small collection of islands in Norway where the sun never sets. The two main characters show readers, that even in attempts to illogically escape problems, solutions are possible. Various reading guides are already available online to accompany this novel, which was released in early June of 2015.
  5. TheSunlitNightLooking for something more classic? According to the Center for Learning and Teaching of Literature, these are the top 10 books taught in American public high schools. They may pop up on your “required” summer reading list, but are also great books for understanding the history and significance of some of these great pieces:
    1. Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare
    2. Macbeth by William Shakespeare
    3. Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
    4. Julius Caesar byWilliam Shakespeare
    5. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
    6. The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne
    7. Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck
    8. Hamlet by William Shakespeare
    9. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
    10. Lord of the Flies by William Golding

We would love for you to share your favorite summer reads with us.

 New Call-to-action

Posted on: July 24, 2015 by M. Dubbs in

Quick Tips in Education

|

Top 5 Summer Reads for Grades 6-8 Part:2

The second edition of our summer reads posts, focuses on middle school aged students. These books will challenge them while also keeping the themes and story structures simple and age appropriate.

 
HP-THE-SERIES

Top 5 Summer Reads for Middle School Students

  1. WonderMiddle school is a great time to jump on the Harry Potter band wagon, and have your child become invested in a complex storyline with a variety of characters and themes. Imagination and creativity take center stage in this series, and readers can dive even deeper with the film series, online, and even at “The Wizarding World of Harry Potter” theme park in Orlando.
  2. Wonder (Wonder #1) by R.J. Palacio chronicles a boy’s journey from home school to a traditional brick and mortar, as a child with a severe deformity. The message of acceptance and kindness in this book translates from children to adults as well, reminding us all to not judge a book by its cover.
  3. ThePhantomTollboothIf you have a math whiz on your hands, the Norton Juster classic The Phantom Tollbooth is a great book to bridge the gap between math and reading. This book follows Milo, into different worlds of technology and numbers. Despite an original publication date of 1961, the book has had a bit of a resurgence with the popularity of STEM education.
  4. Looking for a way to boost your “cool-parent” points? Suggest Between U and Me: How to Rock Your Tween Years with Style and Confidence by Zedyana. While this might not have a traditional classroom education feel, parents can rest assured, that Zedyana (Zed – yan – ah) is a positive role model. Star of hit Disney Channel TV series “Shake It Up” and “Dancing with the Stars” runner up just graduated high school in the same class as Olympian Gabby Douglass from Oak Park Independent School in California. In the book, she gives young teens advice on topics from friends, to romance, as well as giving her fans a peak at her life as a Disney Channel super star.
  5. IslandoftheBlueDolphinsLoosely based on a true story, Island of the Blue Dolphins follows a Native American girl stranded on an island for 18 years. The book chronicles her survival skills, as well as a story of self-discovery after becoming separated from her family. This book is often used in classrooms and there is an abundance of resources for parents online who want to take the learning experience to the next level.

We would love for you to share your favorite summer reads with us.

 New Call-to-action

Posted on: July 17, 2015 by M. Dubbs in

Quick Tips in Education

|

Top 5 Summer Reads for Grades K-4 Part:1

The first of a series of three on some great summer reading books for all ages! These books will provide both education and entertainment during the dog days of summer for your K- 5 students. Many of these books tie together other subject areas.

grossology

Top 5 Summer Reads for Elementary School Students

  1. FreddySavetheEarthScience lovers will enjoy any book in the Grossology collection by Sylvia Branzei, which explores all types of unsophisticated bodily features, noises, and the biology and or anatomy behind them. Other books in the collecting in include: Grossology and You, Animal Grossology, and Hands-On Grossology
  2. For an environmental lesson for young readers, Ready Freddy! #25 – Save the Earth! will explore Earth Day, conservation and going green. The author and first grade teacher Abby Klien has written over 30 books Ready Freddy! books, each one focusing on one simple storyline, holiday or event.
  3. TheMazeofBonesThe Lemonade War pits brother and sister against one another because of the differences in their personalities and learning abilities. This book gives students lessons in math, business, money and responsibility. Another “first in a series,” parents can visit lemonadewar.com to download educational guides and students can interact online with activities and videos – or just head outside and start your own lemonade stand!
  4. First in a series of 10 books, The Maze of Bones (39 Clues, #1) challenges recall, and problem solving in readers, as they follow the two main characters (Amy and Dan) are lead down a historical trail, discovering clues that will eventually revel a family secret.
  5. TheLionthe WitchandtheWardrobeOlder elementary students who are ready for chapter books and more complex story lines can enter the fantasy world of The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe. Since this book has been around for quite some time, parents and older siblings can join the conversation about the books themes and symbols.

We would love for you to share your favorite summer reads with us.

 

New Call-to-action

Posted on: July 10, 2015 by M. Dubbs in

Quick Tips in Education

|

Subscribe